Coming up next at machinaloci space

Carol Mancke, thinking in circles together

Table 15 in use at Uncaptured Land (2017) Carol Mancke & Trena Noval (photo by Chris Benton)
In April 2021, after seven and a half years of wayward research, Carol earned a PhD in Fine Art Practice from the Royal College of Art, London for her project about the creative agency of public collaborative thinking within art practice*. She invites visitors to watch her film I was there (2021) and trace their own route through a few views into the uneven terrain of her research journey.

Radical ideas are fragile and vulnerable to straight-on attack. But Carol believes they can be held in peripheral vision, nurtured in the backs of minds and thus allowed to gather strength over time. When she first imagined a place like machinaloci space, it was with a question in mind: could fostering collaborative thinking practices in the context of art create opportunities for such fragile ideas to emerge, be shared and tested, and maybe, just maybe, take root in public discourse?

Carol in residence for tea and conversation:

  • Monday, March 14- Friday, March 18: 3:30-5:30PM

Watch Carol’s film I was there (2021)

  • Monday, March 14 to Friday, March 18: 3:00PM
  • Saturday, March 19: 12:00; 2:15PM
  • Sunday, March 20: 12:00PM

Join a public conversation: thinking in circles together :

Saturday March 19: 1:00-4:30PM (come for all or part)

  • 1:00-2:15 Windows, reflecting on The Window Project @ machinaloci space
  • 2:15 Screening of I was there
  • 3:00-3:45 Tea, reflecting on tea practice (whisked tea will be served)
  • 3.45-5:00 Table, reflecting on activities around Table 15 in and out of machinaloci space 2017-2022.

The conversations will be moderated by Susan Moffat, Creative Director of Future Histories Lab and Executive Director of the Global Urban Humanities Initiative at UC Berkeley, and others. Tea will be presented by Nancy Hamilton and friends.

Please RSVP for 3/19 event: contact carol@machinaloci.com.

*Dissertation title: Thinking in Public: The Affordances of Hopeless Spaces

Next at machinaloci space:

Saturday March 5, 2:00-5:00 PM: book launch for James Rojas and John Kamp’s new book:

Dream Play Build, Hands-on Community Engagement for Enduring Spaces and Places

at machinaloci space, 1721 63rd  Street, Berkeley.

Samuel Assefa, Director of the  Governor’s Office of Planning and Research writes about Dream Play Build:

a must-read for decision makers who engage in place making and community development. It incorporates captivating community stories, useful photos, and illustrations to provide a guide to the Place It! method – a groundbreaking, tactile, and playful tool. Together Rojas and Kamp make a compelling case for the need to democratize knowledge of, and participation in, city planing for ‘every day people’.


Design and architecture journalist and former host of KCRW’s podcast DnA: Design and Architecture, Frances Anderton writes:

James Rojas and John Kamp’s approach involves a kit of colors and materials, and a joyful process of hands-on, intuitive learning-by-doing. Dream Play Build is a must-read for anyone wanting to meaningfully draw people into the creation of their own environments – through dreaming it and making it, themselves.

James Rojas is an urban planner, community activist, and artist. He has developed an innovative public-engagement and community-visioning method that uses art making as its medium. Through this method he has engaged thousands of people by facilitating over one thousand workshops and building hundreds of interactive models around the world – from the streets of New York and San Francisco, to Mexico, Canada, Europe, and South America. He has collaborated with municipalities, non-profits, community groups, educational institutions, and museums, to engage, educate, and empower the public on transportation, housing, open space, and health issues. https://www.placeit.org/

John Kamp runs the landscape, urban design, and engagement practice Prairieform and also works with Place It! He is an urban and landscape designer, facilitator, and licensed landscape contractor who has developed innovative tools to engage people of all ages and backgrounds in both design and the natural world. He is also an experienced facilitator, trainer, and educator who leads hands-on interactive workshops with James Rojas. He frequently translates the findings and outcomes of those workshops into designs for inclusive and livable streets and neighborhoods that leave room for all residents to improvise and help create a more welcoming public realm. https://www.prairieform.com/

Artist/Architect Carol Mancke runs machinaloci space. http://www.machinaloci.com

now at machinaloci space: James Gouldthorpe, Telling Pictures: Experiments in Narrative

Public event: Saturday, February 26, 2022, 2:00-5:00PM
James in residence at machinaloci space for impromptu conversations:
          Thursdays, 3-5:00pm, February 10, 17, 24
          Saturdays, 3-5:00pm, February 12, 19, 26
Visit other times by appointment (carol@machinaloci.com)

James Gouldthorpe creates large painting installations that when installed transform an exhibition space into an immersive narrative. The work often resembles an expansive abstract graphic novel that examines the intersection of literature and visual art. Along with his painting, he works with video, photography and audio. James has been in residence at the Prelinger Archive, Willapa Bay AIR, Montalvo Art Center and Recology at the San Francisco Dump. He has received the Jay Defeo Prize and several grants including the Lillian Orlowsky and William Freed Grant and the Center for Cultural Innovation’s Investing in Artist Grant. His work has been shown nationally and internationally. A selection of his Covid Artifact series was included in the Close To Home exhibit at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art during 2020. For the past twenty-five years he has worked in the conservation lab at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.  jwgouldthorpe@gmail.com

 Seventy of James’ Covid Artifacts are shown in Telling Pictures: Experiments in Narrative. James writes:

It was an attempt to document the objects, people and events that suddenly became infused with cultural relevance due to the pandemic. Each day I followed the news and searched the Internet discovering unexpected new artifacts, each artifact illustrating a new page in the global pandemic narrative. As the pandemic progressed layers of social dysfunction were exposed, I tried to capture those moments in the archive of the times that Covid Artifacts became.

The project became a way to cope.  Focusing on painting kept me from spinning out in the face of an uncertain future, and, posting an image a day on my social media allowed me to stay connected to friends, fellow artists and eventually strangers.  

After a full year I stopped the manic daily painting as I had to return to my job in a full-time capacity. I still paint an occasional artifact as we wait for the world to right itself.

In addition to Covid Artifacts, Telling Pictures: Experiments in Narrative features Christmas Eve (2018), Mathematica (2018-19), and Complicated Matters (working title, work-in-progress). Also available for your perusal are a collection of ephemera – found books, magazines, and photos –  which have inspired James’ work.

James also contributed images of his work to the latest Window Project @ machinaloci space, which will be on display for the duration of his show. 

The 63rd Street Window Project

December 1, 2021-January 31, 2022: The 63rd Street Window Project participatory neighborhood art project. Drop by machinaloci space anytime to pick up a participation postcard!

Saturday December 11, 1:00-3:30 PM: 63rd Street WalkAbout with James Rojas and John Kamp of PLACE IT! For more information or to sign up click here or contact jamestrojas@gmail.com.

Developed in conjunction with Sarah Bade’s ~ everything, everywhere, all the time ~, The 63rd Street Window Project is a participatory installation that asks you to help discover what might make a place a neighborhood.

Naming something allows us to see that thing or concept more clearly and to share our thoughts about it more easily. Scientist/writer Robin Wall Kimmerer writes that to name is to pay attentionShe sees naming as a form of loving. Sarah and I think that to draw or paint is another way to pay attention – another way to love. We invite you to love 63rdStreet (or your street) and join us to explore our neighborhood by loving what we find in our streets through drawings and stories. 

The 63rd Street Window Project continues until the end of 2021! Please drop by anytime to check it out and pick up a blank postcard that awaits your contribution!

63rd Street WalkAbout walk and workshop

On December 11, 2021, James Rojas and John Kamp of PLACE IT! will lead the first ever 63rd Street WalkAbout, a guided sensory walk along 63rd Street, followed by a hands-on workshop. The walk will begin at either end of 63rd and converge on machinaloci space for a interactive neighborhood re-imagining workshop based on memory and experiences. For more information contact James Rojas at jamestrojas@gmail.comClick here to register!

James Rojas is an urban planner, community activist, and artist. He has developed an innovative public-engagement and community-visioning method that uses art making as its medium. Through this method he has engaged thousands of people by facilitating over one thousand workshops and building over hundreds interactive models around the world – from the streets of New York and San Francisco, to Mexico, Canada, Europe, and South America. He has collaborated with municipalities, non-profits, community groups, educational institutions, and museums, to engage, educate, and empower the public on transportation, housing, open space, and health issues.

John Kamp runs the landscape, urban design, and engagement practice Prairieform and also works with Place It! He is an urban and landscape designer, facilitator, and licensed landscape contractor who has developed innovative tools to engage people of all ages and backgrounds in both design and the natural world. He is also an experienced facilitator, trainer, and educator who leads hands-on interactive workshops with James Rojas of Place It!. He frequently translates the findings and outcomes of those workshops into designs for inclusive and livable streets and neighborhoods that leave room for all residents to improvise and help create a more welcoming public realm (https://www.prairieform.com).

James and John are authors of the soon to be released Dream Play Build Hands On Community Engagement for Enduring Spaces and Places (www.placeit.org).

Sarah Bade is an artist who divides her time between family in California and Switzerland, who worked for decades in the back country of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. While raising children, Sarah taught art in schools across the Bay Area, worked in literacy education, and volunteered in youth sports. Sarah’s art reflects the deep knowledge she acquired working alongside people and animals in remote landscapes, by children’s literature, and by everyday visual experiences we all share in our neighborhoods (sbade@stickstones.com).

Architect/Artist Carol Mancke runs machinaloci space on 63rd Street in Berkeley (www.machinaloci.com).

Sarah and Carol share a love of storytelling and collaboration. They celebrate the many ways the paths of living things converge and how experiences can be brought to life in pictures and images.

machinaloci space presents

~ everything, everywhere, all the time ~

an exhibition of works on paper by Sarah Bade

  • October 10 – December 5, 2021
    • Opening event: Sun, 10 October 2021, 3-5:00 pm
    • Public talk + workshop: Sat, Nov 6 2021, 1-4:00 pm RSVP!
    • Closing event: Sun, Dec 5, 2021, 3-5:00 pm

machinaloci space, 1721 63rd Street, Berkeley CA 94703
other times by appointment, contact carol@machinaloci.com

Accompanying this collection of paintings on paper that proposes encounters or conversations between nature and culture, Sarah has brought examples of what inspires her to the table – postcards, children’s books, her own photographs, and more. This show invites you in to begin to see how anything, anywhere, at any time is worthy of loving attention.

Sarah Bade is an artist who divides her time between family in California and Switzerland and who worked for decades in the back country of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. While raising children, Sarah taught art in schools across the Bay Area, worked in literacy education, and volunteered in youth sports. Sarah’s art reflects the deep knowledge she acquired working alongside people and animals in remote landscapes, children’s literature, and the everyday visual experiences we all share in our neighborhoods. sbade@stickstones.com

~ everything, everywhere, all the time ~ has been developed in conjunction with the neighborhood art project, The 63rd Street Window Project.

Sarah Bade joins machinaloci space founder Carol Mancke to think about what makes a place a neighborhood. They invite you to help discover and celebrate the flourishing community of life that shares these streets where we live.

machinaloci space invasion!

Artist collective Bossman* and artist Hella Gerlach invade machinaloci space with Table Service!

opening:
     Sunday August 8, 2021, 3:00 to 6:00
public conversation between Bossman’s sasha rossman and machinaloci’s Carol Mancke, moderated by John Kamp:
   Saturday August 21, 2021, 10:00 to 12:00

About Table Service

On your plate:
 
What could be less remarkable than eating a meal on a plate while seated at a table? Yet both plates and tables have a history that belies their current ubiquity. It was during the so-called Renaissance that plates, as we know them today, came into common use in Europe. It was even later that the dining room – and dining table – emerged as a specialized site for eating with a small group of friends and family. Prior to that, most eating was done on tables that could be set up and then dismantled after a meal. This flexibility was important because most rooms in a home served multiple functions. Large dining areas, for example, were also used for dancing and other ways of assembling not related to eating. It was therefore important to have furniture that could be easily whisked in and out of the way: tables could be assembled and taken apart, and benches could be moved quickly the side of the room so they would not be in the way. Chairs were an unnecessary encumbrance. The flexible nature of these spaces, and the diverse array of classed bodies within them, found a material and metaphorical iteration in the objects that people ate from: communal troughs or trenchers and spoons that dripped as diners reached into shared bowls and pots. Juices flowed and dribbled; bodies conjoined in the consumption of liquidy, stewy sauces and potages.

By the sixteenth century, these practices had begun to change. Communal dining platters were replaced by individual plates with clearly demarcated borders. In the late seventeenth century, forks would come into general usage. These objects pierced pieces of food and lifted them cleanly out of a sauce or soup, minimizing shared trickle. Plates reflected a new interest in clearly defining bodies: instead of overflowing into one’s neighbor’s space, each individual at the table had a delineated individual zone. This space was embodied by the round plate, which mirrored the “rational” head of the person at the table. It was like a symbolic portrait of that person. The table’s top separated the head, removing the rational, thinking part of the body from its base, which was hidden under the table. The polite diner was no longer corporeally linked to others at the table. Instead, manners and etiquette bound the diners together through an internalized set of rulesDon’t belch, don’t drip, don’t spit, don’t reach into the pot with your piece of bread. Use your head! Use a fork, not your fingers!

For machinaloci space, Bossman stages a pop-up featuring Carol Mancke’s Table 15 and a series of plates that Bossman is producing for the occasion. Each plate displays a cat licking its private parts. These preening pussies are what would be revealed after a diner has licked their plate clean. A frisson of naughty voyeuristic delight flickers into view. The cats are derived from medieval manuscript marginalia, which frequently featured felines cleaning themselves. These kitties, once hidden in flurries of border ornamentation, have now crawled out of the margins and taken center-stage, hanging on the wall like portraits in a gallery.

Meanwhile, a soft body lurks under the table. Artist Hella Gerlach has designed a tentacled creeper, which wraps through the Table 15’s perforated armature. Its entangled limbs ooze out from under the tabletop, threatening to ensnare those who approach. The multicolored, stitched-together body parts are reminiscent of the unruly floppy communal corpus that previously dripped and dribbled around shared troughs. A body banished by the tyranny of tedious decorum has returned. Its ghost now says, “Surprise! I’m back, and for sale.”


*Bossman is a parasitic brand that inhabits other vessels. It is a surprise gift for the world, irreverently, irately, and intuitively resisting adulting in cities starting with the letter “B”.
For further info contact sasha.rossman@gmail.com.

American as a Second Language

Kasia Krzykawska

30 January – 31 March 2021

2021 marks 400 years since the first Thanksgiving meal, 100 years since the artist Joseph Beuys’ birth, and nearly 50 years since his 1974 performance I like America, and America Likes Me. The events of the last few weeks serve as a forceful reminder of the danger inherent in any singular story of what it means to be American, and how important it is to listen to and fully value all voices and histories. Kasia Krzykawska’s questioning of national myth-making in American as a Second Language could not be timelier!
This is a COVID safe artwork intended to be viewed from outdoors, outside machinaloci space. The artist will be present in person and virtually to launch the project on January 30th. Please come to look at the work and add your comments any time!
‘[T]he America encountered by these yearning souls was no visible saint but an invisible, ever-receding, unloving god.’ (Puritan Conversion Narrative 134)

When, as a recent immigrant to the US, Krzykawska was assigned a story of Thanksgiving to read for her English language class, she was intrigued by the coexistence of contradictory narratives around Thanksgiving. This led her to research the relationship between rituals of national glorification and enduring silence about genocide in the commemoration of Thanksgiving. She writes:

It seems that beautiful lies are more useful for maintaining the fluidity of national traditions than truth is. In this I find a surprising similarity to my homeland, Poland. Like the monuments toppling here in the US, national mythologies are slowly falling apart there.
In American as a Second Language, I address Thanksgiving’s dilemmas by alluding to Joseph Beuys’ 1974 performance I Like America, and America Likes Me, in which he locked himself in a cell with a live coyote, an indigenous animal, to “discuss” troubling American politics. I also refer to one of the first American monuments to make my own Plymouth Rock – an ironic memorial to my own arrival exactly 400 years after the Pilgrims.

Abraham Lincoln established Thanksgiving as a national holiday during the Civil War in 1863 – something to draw the nation together. On January 18 2021, The [PAST] President’s Advisory 1776 Commission released The 1776 Report. In the conclusion it said:

‘To be an American means something noble and good. It means treasuring freedom and embracing the vitality of self-government. We are shaped by the beauty, bounty, and wildness of our continent. We are united by the glory of our history. And we are distinguished by the American virtues of openness, honesty, optimism, determination, generosity, confidence, kindness, hard work, courage, and hope. Our principles did not create these virtues, but they laid the groundwork for them to grow and spread and forge America into the most just and glorious country in all of human history.

On January 20 2021, the 1776 Report was no longer available on line. Here are a few words from President Biden’s inaugural speech:

 ‘Will we rise to the occasion, is the question? Will we master this rare and difficult hour? Will we meet our obligations and pass along a new and better world to our children? I believe we must. I’m sure you do as well. I believe we will. And when we do, we’ll write the next great chapter in the history of the United States of America. The American story. A story that might sound something like a song that means a lot to me. It’s called American Anthem. There’s one verse that stands out, at least for me, and it goes like this:     

The work and prayers of a century have brought us to this day.
What shall be our legacy? What will our children say?
 Let me know in my heart when my days are through.
 America, America, I gave my best to you.

 Let’s add. Let us add our own work and prayers to the unfolding story of our great nation. If we do this, then when our days are through, our children and our children’s children will say of us: They gave their best, they did their duty, they healed a broken land.

and the beat goes on…? 

Krzykawska treats the shopfront window of machinaloci space as a sketchbook for quotes and thoughts that she gathered while adapting to a new land, new histories, and new cultural codes. The glass is big enough to host more than her impressions. Krzykawska invites you to discuss and share your thoughts within the fragile public space of The Window Project @ machinaloci space.
http://www.krzykawska.com

machinaloci space 1721 63rd Street, Berkeley, California 94703

The Window Project @ machinaloci space 2020 LIFE IS A TREASURE by Adrian Arias

Adrian Arias is a multidisciplinary artist who in times of pandemic and social revolution decided to recreate his visual language by getting closer to petroglyphs, African and pre-Columbian textile design, combining the appearance of the new monsters that populate our mind in pandemic, with the new angels of revolution and social change emerging in our communities.

Adrian Arias, continuously evolves images, colors, and feelings framed by the urge of creation itself. An inventive visual artist of infinite forms and mediums. Nina Serrano, poet and activist at KPFA Radio in Berkeley

Adrian Arias, the ever brilliantly inventive poet of the gesturing Word. – Jack Hirschman, Poet Laureate of San Francisco